How To Prevent Or Get Rid Of Sebaceous Filaments

Sebaceous filaments? Now that’s a mouthful!

It is, but the goal is not to get a face full.

Similar to whiteheads or blackheads, sebaceous filaments appear as pin-like dots on your nose, cheeks, chin, and forehead. Often gray, tan, and flesh-colored, they form when bacteria, oil, and dead skin cells clog your pores.

Eww, right? Well, here are a few ways you can prevent or get rid of sebaceous filaments.

Cleanliness is next to flawlessness

Exfoliation — removing dead skin cells — is key. Your local drugstore probably carries enzyme peels. These work to dissolve sebaceous filaments by removing your skin’s outer layers. Look for products that contain papaya, pumpkin, and pineapple enzymes.

Enzyme peels are mild. For something a bit stronger try salicylic acid. Found in cleansers and products that treat acne, it frees sebaceous filaments, blackheads, and whiteheads from pores by breaking down skin cells.

To prevent sebaceous filaments use makeup, creams, and cleansers that won’t clog your pores. Look for facial products labeled noncomedogenic.

Another way to prevent sebaceous filaments is by washing with exfoliating scrubs weekly. But don’t overdo it. Scrubbing too much can irritate and inflame your skin, which can then become a breeding ground for more of those icky bumps.

Whatever you do, don’t pick at sebaceous filaments. This can spread bacteria and damage your skin tissue, even to the point of scarring.

clear + brilliant

 

Strip, mask, peel, repeat

Sebaceous filaments have a tough time forming if you cut off the oil. To do this, try using a clay mask once a week for half an hour.

If they form anyway, you can always pull them out. Pore strips do an incredibly good job of this. For best results, use them in conjunction with salicylic acid treatments.

While we’re on the subject of pores, you can always get a deep-pore cleansing facial. This powerful treatment involves cleansing, steaming, enzyme peel, facial massage, extractions, a clay mask, and a moisturizer. Getting a deep-cleansing pore facial once or twice a month will help to keep sebaceous filaments at bay.

Tech to keep 'em in check

Large pores and oily skin may prevent these treatments from working. If you have experienced this, it may be time to step up your game. You can go strong against sebaceous filaments by getting an intense pulsed light (IPL) photo facial. Its gentle pulses of light treat sebaceous filaments, even acne and rosacea. And it smooths and refines your complexion in the bargain.

Another powerful treatment for sebaceous filaments is Clear + Brilliant. A noninvasive dioxide laser, it reduces pore size as it refreshes your skin from the inside out. With smaller pores comes a smaller chance of sebaceous filaments.

Filament-free and lovin' it

Whatever method of prevention or elimination you choose, the good news is that your complexion isn't doomed to being a filament farm. With the right beauty regimen, you can look forward to a smooth, glowing complexion. Soon you'll be saying, "Sebaceous filaments? Never heard of them."

References

  1. "How Can I Stop Sebaceous Filaments from Forming?", Acne.org, September 29, 2010.
  2. "Not Blackheads: Sebaceous Filaments and How to Get Rid of Them," Marie Claire, October 25, 2016.
  3. "So Those Might Not Be Blackheads on Your Nose After All," InStyle, December 23, 2016.
  4. "Those Things On Your Nose Are Called Sebaceous Filaments, And Here's How To Get Rid Of Them," XO Vain, September 4, 2013.

acne | cosmetics | pores | skin conditions | skin care